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Career Transition 101

If you're wanting to leave clinical practice, you need to adjust your perspective towards communicating with others. Your job is to make as many connections as possible and to remove the common physician roadblocks that keep people from contacting you.
Transitioning from clinical practice to a nonclinical role is a challenging process. I know, I've helped more than a thousand physicians achieve that goal. However, there's no need to make the process more difficult or challenging than it already is. So, here are few of the very basics that day to day you may not consider since they are somewhat baked into your clinical practice.

Let's begin with the very most basic - answer your phone.. You may be laughing now, but seriously, answer your phone. Physicians are rather notorious for not answering phones or setting up some screening capability to discourage what they perceive as unwanted calls. However, when you're seeking career change, wanted versus unwanted calls can be difficult to separate. An unknown number may actually be your next employer.... if you answer the call. However, if you're really just loath to cordially answer all calls to your phone, try as I suggest to many clients. Buy a separate phone or phone line for your career work. Also, don't forget proper phone manners for the business world. Answering your phone by demand, "who is this," is not a good start to most conversations.

Buy some professional-looking business cards that tout your expertise - outside medicine. If you're interested in population health, put that on your business card... or healthcare policy... etc and drop the assorted degrees and accreditations. It may be old fashioned, but the rule of thumb was always to list only the highest degree attained, and no listings for anything less than a doctorate. Just food for thought. 

Develop a stump speech... that is, Who I am, What I've done, What I want to do, and How I can help you.... I've written extensively about the value of a sound and concise (30-45 seconds) stump speech... or elevator pitch, if you prefer. This and your business card represent your opening salvo to almost any job you will get. I speak with physicians every day who tell me, "I'm not good at talking about myself." Well, then expect to stay in clinical practice, because no one can sell you but you, and the typical CV you might present to a nonclinical employer is unlikely to open many doors. 

Listen to people. Every day you listen to your patients because they will tell you what's wrong with them. It's the same with potential employers or networking contacts... listen and they will tell you about their problems so you can figure out how to solve them. You already know this, you'll lean by listening, not by talking. Career transition is a learning process. 

Associate with people doing what you want to do. Every time I say this I'm asked, "How?" Just like medical specialties, nearly every career niche has a professional society or networking group. Join, attend, participate. Simply by entering the room, you're accorded a certain level of expertise - otherwise why would you be there? So, go and listen, and carve out your niche within your target group. 

Search job boards, not for jobs to apply to, but rather to learn about expectations, qualification deficiencies you may need to overcome, the "lingo" of the industry, what companies seem to be in hiring modes, and other career intelligence that may improve your knowledge and understanding of where you're wanting to go. 

Develop and implement a plan. Career transition is a process, not an event. Have realistic time expectations both for commitment and duration and chart your progress objectively. 

If you'd like to learn more, contact me, Robert Priddy. Phone and TEXT: 720-339-3585, email: rfp@thirdevo.com or use my Contact Page. 


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ZDikrsuxJKpqMTwY VwpUIHOAoLBebv · October 18, 2019
UFTPMzEnvr DGftAbhQCzJpR · October 18, 2019
GCLNuorQRSB LDXmiAVgfS · October 27, 2019
iymEnjQxdub hpAjLbTHnENiGBD · October 27, 2019
BDcqrtfbu NHwWlpKuq · October 28, 2019
ZnBfClymouSe etqMnLHBxGmj · October 28, 2019
IiMYBsgr wghyCSrBFtQmfeqW · November 05, 2019
wxlLCMZks PtOYFLpWeXs · November 05, 2019
SJdVrkWcHCYDQ PmGvwVhdTauQKF · November 12, 2019
BWEYgCnFIJLGy RszOrucLPIUngWEd · November 12, 2019
fJEhYAVwkqBF mRGnYgsUV · November 18, 2019
CGkWNeJcjATVxl NsWKfUOdaXekMhx · November 18, 2019